Monthly Introduction (Getting Started)

Teresa Palombo
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I teach Grade 3 Technology and students start to learn Scratch by coding and animating their initials. They quickly learn how to add other animations and love it!
Adam Furgang
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
This is great. I'm working on a Scratch book right now. This will be very helpful.
Anonymous
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
Our entry or initial activity is a free practice left the students to explore and discover the entire editor tool. We call it “Day of breaking sctrach”
Meneta
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I have started students in Scratch in a variety of ways, including the Hour of Code Scratch activities. Most often we show this video https://vimeo.com/65583694 , then "fearlessly explore" followed by the Getting started tutorial and a curricular activity.
Meneta
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
Forgot to ask where we can get one of those SIP mugs!!!
Beazley ITRT
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
Our fifth graders were first introduced to Scratch through Google's CS First curriculum - Create your own Google Logo!  They loved it and look forward to any opportunity to code with Scratch, at school and/or at home!
Gayla Webb
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I teach Scratch to my 3rd-5th graders.  The first day, I give a tour of the Scratch editor and then send them off to explore.  Their goal is to figure out something and share with a friend.  I always tell them that they can't do anything to mess up the Scratch editor......it's indestructible.
ITS66
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I am using Scratch with 4th Graders.  We started with several classes of exploration, then we focused on timing conversations and basic animation.  The students were given a choice to do a story, game, greeting card or nonfiction piece.  They have just finished writing proposals for their choice and just started creating...they love it!
RobinTSS
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I introduce Scratch in 3rd grade, but prior to that the students have worked with many unplugged activities and ScratchJr in the younger grades.  The transition is amazingly easy for them since they already understand the basic concepts.  In third grade they work through projects I have adapted from the Scratch Curriculum Guide released in 2014.  http://scratched.gse.harvard.edu/resources/scratch-curriculum-guide.  They also work on projects that integrate Scratch with they are studying in their other subjects.
April Leonard
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
Introduce Scratch to my students in 4th &5th grade by starting with exploration activities. I start them off in Google Classroom where I have a link to sign up and help them learn how to create bookmarks so they can quickly and easily sign into Scratch. I start with activities that are easy like moving the sprite, I have been using a curriculum that was shared with me to guide the students in creating new projects. https://sites.google.com/sfusd.edu/3-5cs/home
Mr. G
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I introduced Scratch to my fourth and fifth graders by having them animate their names.  The tutorial was great, in fact, I encouraged my students to explore the other tutorials to learn other features.  I tell them that my job is not to teach them code, instead it's my job to teach them how to teach themselves!  Currently we are coding superhero avatars we created on another site into a story/game.  My Scratchers are loving it!  Now, if I can somehow get one of those Scratch mugs my life will be complete.
Javier Rosales - RoboThink (Chula Vista, CA)
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
In our first class, I've been going thru a brief 3-pager overview of the console elements & then have them students execute the "Race to Finish" project using the Scratch cards. 

I like & will take some of your ideas tough, I will switch my first day to: Overview, the Vimeo video and the “Day of breaking scratch” concept, described above. 

My second day will be the "Coding their name" (replacing "Race to Finish").
Honestly I get overwhelm with all the info I get after clicking around Scratch resources, my classes end up executing the Scratch card projects and very limited coding concepts explanations. 
I would love to follow a curriculum that includes a set of 20-30 progressive learning classes, each one to include a Code concept teaching, a small activity to reinforce that concept (i.e. teach Loops explained -> create a square activity)and the cards for a project. Maybe after 4-classes a quiz. Videos, text books, etc.
On a different topic, love those mugs too!
Francesco Vino
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I teach Scratch in Italian school and I love it! I've introduced it to students from 13 to 16 of age. It's a great tool for my pupils to get started with the art of programming in a fun and easy way. I can create examples from basic to advanced algorithms. I like SiP and I think it will be very useful.
Pat Lewallen
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I teach Scratch in the 6th grade.  I like to kick things off by having the students create the "About Me" program.  3 sprites that describe something about them.  I especially love the teacher account.  Discovered that for this year.  Makes it very easy to see the student's work.  
As you plan these events, consider doing one on how to introduce and teach the use of variables.  I've tried several ways for this, but none seems to work to my satisfaction.  Some advice and other examples would be most appreciated.
Anonymous
18 days agoFebruary 1, 2019
I am still new to teaching scratch I would love to learn a lot from this series
Anonymous
18 days agoFebruary 2, 2019
I am finding that kids just need a few opening ‘hints’ and things to try to get them going...then their natural curiosity takes over and they start asking anyone and everyone, “How do you...”? It’s much harder to introduce Scratch to grown-ups - they tend to want to know how to do everything ahead of time.
Rimantas
17 days agoFebruary 2, 2019
I teach grade 3 in my school. Since those little kids still have trouble turning on a computer, I introduce Scratch by giving students an asigment to "move the kitty". I show them on the screen how to create this two-step program and afterwords tell them "See how it's simple? You have just become a programmer!".
Students get more self-confident and start to believe that programming is possible for them.
PierLuigi Franchi
16 days agoFebruary 3, 2019
Wonderful idea, can't wait to see how to fire the programming passion into young minds
Justin Heckman
15 days agoFebruary 4, 2019
We introduce scratch starting in our K classes.  The students will take their names and do different colors and animation.  By fourth grade, they are programming ev3 Lego robotics and coding hummingbird robotic kits tieing their curriculum into coding.  We have implemented a completely k-4 coding immersion coding program that gets our students coding 30 minutes a day.
Chris Betcher
14 days agoFebruary 5, 2019
With grades 5/6 I sometimes start them off by asking them to get the cat to trace out a square shape.  This uses forward commands, turns, introduces angles and distance, then builds on that with loops and repetition to create more elegant code.  Then we introduce the wait and pen up/down commands to leave the square on the screen. Once they work all that out we duplicate and refine the script to draw a hexagon, octagon and triangle, each one triggered by a different keypress.
If the class is coping with all that, I challenge them to using the input command to draw any n-sided shape. There's some good math involved in all this!
Chris Betcher
14 days agoFebruary 5, 2019
@Pat, regarding the teaching of variables, one simple way I have approached this is to have a script with two sprites, a person and a dog.  The person asks the dog a question like "How old are you?", and then waits for user input (Let's say they type 4).  The dog then replies with "That's 28 in dog-years!)  Behind the scenes, the user input variable (in this case 4) is multiplied by 7 (apparently there are approximately 7 dog years for every human year) and gives the answer 28.  
Being based on user input (the variable) you get a different answer each time.
Ana Rodrigues
13 days agoFebruary 6, 2019
In Scratch 3.0 I show them the "Surprise Sprite" button, and how to make the characters talk. I then ask them to click on it 3 times and I encourage them to come up with a story with those 3 characters. :) They love it!
Anonymous
13 days agoFebruary 6, 2019
I was introduced to scratch at school where I had to make a times tables game it was really fun so I wanted to continue and I made myself a scratch account
Your comment